The People News, a free newspaper serving Cleveland Tennessee (TN) and Bradley County Tennessee (Tn).





Of Bradley County Tn.


APRIL  2003

                            The People News, a free newspaper serving Cleveland and Bradley County Tn.

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Improve The World
By Listening To The Kids

It has been said that great truths come from children and industry is finding that out.
In a report several months back, it was stated that major industries are finding out that to solve many of their engineering problems, a panel of small children may be the simple solution to all of their concerns.
It has been reported that Fortune 500 companies were bringing little kids into their corporative offices and asking their opinions on many of the products that you and I purchase each day. The children have solved major costly problems that company engineers have been unable to solve after months of testing and computer analyzing. I'm sure the children's answers to some of the unsolved problems have left a few real smart grownups somewhat embarrassed.
It is a simple process where the children are shown a product and asked what would make it better or just what do they think would make it work. Of course, the children do not give a detailed solution to the problems with charts and graphs, but their simplicity of understanding has saved some manufacturers millions of dollars.
The difference from the children and the adult engineers, is the factor that the children have not been told that something will not work. They haven't yet developed a negative way of looking at problems. They still have the desire to question why not.
By the time most of us reach adulthood, we have lost the innocence of a child and have developed a thinking of why things will not and should not work. Many times we spend more effort trying to explain why something will not work than finding a way to solve the problem.
Recently, I received a copy of another study from an unnamed source that was made with some small children and they were asked to give examples of things that do not work or observations they have made in their short lifetime. Here are a few of their comments.
One little boy said, "No matter how hard you try, you can't baptize cats."  Makes you wonder how often he tried.
Another child remarked, "Never ask your three year old brother to hold a tomato." The same child also told the group you cannot trust a dog to watch your food.
In the field of education the comments were:
All libraries smell the same.
Sometimes you have to take the test before you've finished studying.
Reading what people write on desks can teach  you a lot.
School lunches stick to the wall.
Don't expect your friends to be as excited about your "100" as you are.
Ask why until you understand.
In the area of common sense here is what they said.
When your mom is mad at your dad, don't let her brush your hair.
Never hold a dustbuster and a cat at the same time.
It's hard to unlearn a bad word.
Don't wear polka-dot underwear under white shorts.
You can't hide a piece of broccoli in a glass of milk.
Don't nod on the phone.
Silence can be an answer.
Your room gets smaller as you get bigger.
It's only fun to play school when you are the teacher.
Don't sneeze when someone is cutting your hair.
A snow day is more fun than a vacation day.
Don't say that the "last one is a rotten egg" unless you're absolutely sure there is a slow kid behind you.
When you are dressed up like a princess, it's easier to act like one.
If you want a kitten, start out by asking for a horse.
One of my favorites must have come from a child with experience. He said, "If you don't like the birthday girl, don't go to the party."
However, the winner of all the comments was from a child who lovingly commented, "The best place to be when you are sad is in Grandma's lap."
Now, didn't I tell you little kids are smart.

by Pettus Read

- Pettus L. Read is editor of the Tennessee Farm Bureau News and Director of Communications for the Tennessee Farm Bureau Federation.  He may be contacted by e-mail at pread@tfbf.com

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